Autism: Kittens in the freezer

Yes, your eyes are working just fine, the title does say ‘Kittens in the Freezer’!  I put something up on Facebook yesterday mentioning this and had a lot of raised eyebrows, should we be reported to the RSPCA?

No, it wasn’t quite like this!

Errrr…no, we might be bizarre, but we’re not cruel, so let me explain.

It came to pass some years ago that myself and all of the children were on holiday in Devon for a week and a very dear friend was very kindly house sitting for us.  He was minding the dog and all of the cats and making sure the roof didn’t blow off in a storm (it has happened!) or marauding invaders didn’t take over the property (that hasn’t happened yet but there’s plenty of time!), he was also minding our very pregnant cat who wasn’t due to have her babies for at least 2/3 more weeks.

On day two he rang me to say that she’d had 5 beautiful but very small kittens in one of the girls wardrobes, and, so far so good.  Maybe we’d got it wrong and she was a lot further gone than we thought, anyway, she’d had them and Lewis was doing a stirling job of making sure all was well.

Until the next morning when he rang to say that one had died overnight but the rest seemed fine.  I was heartbroken and knew the children would be even more so and they hadn’t even had a chance to see the one we’d lost.

Now, I guess in a normal house this wouldn’t present too much of a problem beyond the grieving process, but, as a lot of you know, most of my children are on the autistic spectrum, so normal rules just don’t apply.  I had to think quickly to try and work out an appropriate resolution where they would at least have the chance of seeing him/her before burial.

I could think of nothing other than emptying a freezer drawer, wrapping it in tissue and putting it in a freezer bag so that we could bury her in the ‘animal burial grounds’ when we returned.  I felt pretty chuffed with myself, this seemed to solve the problem pretty well I thought.

The next day there was more bad news, we’d lost another one, so, the same instructions for poor old Lewis, wrap it in tissue and put it in the freezer.  Over the next couple of day the remaining 3 sadly passed away, they had obviously been born far too early and just couldn’t survive.  The children were all devastated but actually took it better than I had hoped, and they also knew that they would be able to see them when they returned and give them the send off we give all of our departed pets and random wildlife that we’ve tried to rescue over the years ( all dearly loved and named!).

We returned from holiday a few days later and we agreed to bury the kittens the next day as it was late when we got back.  It didn’t happen, nor the next day, or the next.  Chaotic life carried on and the kittens were forgotten, which I feel terribly guilty about but with 7 children to focus on I should probably let myself off the hook!

Time went by and it was about 6 months later that someone came across some mysterious plastic freezer bags with tissue inside.  One of Osborn’s weird experiments?  Probably!  And then it dawned, the kittens!

Everyone felt terrible, how could we have forgotten them for so long?  Life I guess, just busy life.

They were duly given a fitting funeral within the next day or so and laid to rest in somewhere rather more appropriate than the spare freezer.  Putting the kittens in the freezer in the first place had just been a rather wacky solution to the challenges that autism can throw up, they need to see for themselves, they need proof most of the time otherwise it’s too abstract, it’s not real.  My intentions had always been entirely honourable.

So, there it is, the story of The Kittens in the Freezer!




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